/ ba public administration / administrative theory /
Describe the features of a fused model. How does the diffracted model differ from the fused model?

Describe the features of a fused model. How does the diffracted model differ from the fused model?

Owlgen

1 Answer

Traditional agricultural and folk societies (agraria) constitute the fused model. It is functionally diffused. When a structure performs more functions, it is fused. A low level of differentiation with corresponding level of integration makes a system fused. Thus, a fused society is, by definition, undifferentiated and hence integrated. In the fused model, traditional bureaucracies were functionally diffuse, each official typically performed a wide range of functions, affecting political, economic as well as administrative functions. There is dominance of ascriptive, particular and diffuse patterns. The local groups are stable and there is very limited spatial mobility. Occupations differences are very simple and stable. There exists a differential stratification system of diffuse impact.

In Riggsian terms, the less number of functions a society performs, the more diffracted it is. Development according to Riggs is a process of increasing autonomy (discretion) of social systems, made possible by rising levels of diffraction. The development level of a society is reflected in its ability to make decisions in order to control its environment. This decision-making capability is based on the level of diffraction in a. society. Diffraction in turn, is a function of differentiation and integration. A high level of differentiation coupled with a high level of integration makes a system or society diffracted. Diffracted societies are further subdivided and conceptualized as eo-diffracted, ortho-diffracted and neo-diffracted.

Loading...

March 15, 2019
10
Loading...