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Explain the Ciliary and Flagellar Movement.

Explain the Ciliary and Flagellar Movement.

Answer in physiology
Course: B.Sc

CILIARY AND FLAGELLAR MOVEMENTS.

Ciliary locomotion is the characteristic way in which ciliated protozoans or metazoans such as Paramecium moves. However, cilia and flagella are found in all animal phyla in order to serve a variety of functions. For example, cilia set up currents that effect movement through the water vascular systems of echinoderms. The respiratory tract of air breathing vertebrates is lined by the ciliated cells that slowly remove foreign particles that lodge on their surfaces. The sperms move with the aid of tail like flagellum that beats with a symmetrical undulation and is propagated as a wave. In flagellar motion, water is propelled parallel to the long axis of the flagellum, while in ciliary motion water is propelled parallel to the surface that bears the cilia as shown in the figure below.

Ciliary and Flagellar Movements

  • (a) The typical beat of a flagellum propels water parallel to the main axis of the flagellum (arrow),
  • The beating of a cilium (right) propels water parallel to the surface to which the cilium is attached